William Greer Architectural Conservation & Craftsmanship Nominees

This category recognizes building owners who have undertaken projects to conserve or adapt a history building or architectural feature of a historic building within the municipal boundaries of the city of Toronto.

The 2017 nominees are:


Original building: 1892
Conservation work: 2016

Building Owner:
3Gen Development Group Inc.

Architectural Firm:
Williamson Williamson Inc.

Craftsperson:
Geronimo CM LTD

The Birds of Tranby
66 Tranby Avenue

Completed in 1892, this semi-detached house on Tranby Avenue is a classic Annex Style home massed in brick and borrowing elements from the Richardson Romanesque. The original stained glass on the front of the house was intact, although badly in need of repair, including a Birds of Tranby stained glass window.

The great-grandson of the original glass artist restored all the leaded glass in the house and cleaned and reinstalled the decorative hardware.  Additional details in the house that were protected and restored included plaster moldings, the figural stair railing, a paneled living room pocket door, and metal floor grilles.


Original building: 1892
Conservation work: 2016

Building Owner:
Streetcar Developments

Architectural Firm:
ERA Architects Inc.

Heritage Contractor:
Phoenix Restoration Inc.

The Broadview Hotel
106 Broadview Avenue

Built in the Romanesque Revival style of architecture, with ornate exterior terracotta panels, decorative arches, and classical columns, the Broadview Hotel has functioned as a neighbourhood anchor from its construction in 1892 until now.

The conservation strategy for the site focused on rehabilitation and restoration in order to maintain the key architectural features—including the cornices and slate roof—and hotel use of the building.  The severe deterioration of the interior building structure required that an addition be constructed to improve the functional efficiency and public accessibility of this community hub.


Original building: 1914
Conservation work: 2016

Building Owner:
City of Toronto

Architectural Firm:
Taylor Hazell Architects

Craftspeople:
Clifford Restoration Ltd.

Casa Loma
1 Austin Terrace

The restoration of Casa Loma’s exterior masonry and building envelope has spanned more than two decades and involved 12 construction projects; with the completion of the Norman Tower project in 2016, the goal to re-invigorate this iconic civic landmark has been realized.

The conservation practice rested on the development of a master plan as well as materials and prototype testing.  Restoration work included the design and production of new cast roman stone; dismantling, rebuilding and repair of salvaged masonry assemblies; incorporation of new structural elements into these assemblies; protecting flashings and fine sheet metal work; and restoration of leaded and stained glass.


Original building: 1928
Conservation work: 2016, ongoing

Building Owner:
Oxford Property Group

Architectural firm:
GBCA Architects

Craftspeople:
Clifford Restoration Limited

Concourse Building
100 Adelaide Street West

This project involved the conservation of a number of the Concourse Building’s intricate masonry details and well known features, including the colourful mosaic panels created by Group of Seven member J.E.H. MacDonald and the stylized First Nation’s Thunderbird and Sunburst designs created from brick cladding.

Heritage elements, including mosaic and plaster ceilings with painted murals, Thunderbird and Sunburst brick patterns, concrete wheat sheaf panels, Terra Cotta units, original spandrel panels, signage, and the Roman Stone base, were extensively catalogued and dismantled before undergoing a process of repair, restoration, and in some cases reproduction.  These elements were then re-installed on the building’s façade.


Original building: 1932
Conservation work: 2016

Building owner:
Eva’s Initiatives for Homeless Youth

Architectural firm:
LGA Architectural Partners

Eva’s Phoenix: Water Works Building
60 Brant Street

Eva’s is a residence/skills centre for homeless and at risk youth that raises the bar for safe and uplifting non-institutional supportive housing.  This adaptive reuse project realizes a contemporary function and plans for future functionality while enhancing the character of an impressive heritage building.

It stitches together the once divided former warehouse and layers public, semipublic and private spaces to create “a neighbourhood within a building.”  The space is organized around an expansive atrium and includes, ten ‘houses’ with ground level common areas, second level private bedrooms, ‘rooftop’ program areas, offices, classrooms, a teaching kitchen, a print shop, and more.


Original building: 1931
Conservation work: 2015

Building Owner:
The Trustees of Glenview Presbyterian Church

Architect of Record:
Harrison Duong Architects Incorporated (formerly Janet L. Harrison, Architect)

Design Architect:
Davidson Langley Incorporated Architects

Glenview Presbyterian Church
1 Glenview Avenue

Wanting to serve its community the best it can, Glenview Presbyterian Church embarked on a project to provide full accessibility to its facility by adding new barrier free walkways, accessible washrooms and an elevator.

Adding an elevator required a new three floor addition on the north side of the building.  This elevator lobby, anchored by the existing sandstone walls of the church which emphasizes the heritage aspects of the existing façade, now serves as the building’s main entrance.  The result is a space that allows visitors to appreciate the existing stained glass windows, stone coping and sandstone cladding now situated in the lobby space.


Original building: 1889
Conservation work: 2016

Building owner:
Triangle Development Inc.

Architectural firm:
Bernard Watt Architect

Craftspeople:
Marcrest Construction Ltd.

The Great Hall
1087-1089 Queen Street West

Completed in November 2016, the comprehensive restoration project spanned the entire structure and focused on preserving the Great Hall’s original design and period features, while increasing capacity and accessibility with infrastructure updates.

On the exterior of the building, the peaked slate roof with signature turret and tower, original windows, and red brick and Port Credit sandstone façade were repaired and refinished. Interior work included revealing and refinishing the original hardwood floors, coffered ceilings, baseboards, crown mouldings, and the yellow brick walls and wooden balcony running track of the YMCA gymnasium (now Longboat Hall).


Original building: circa 1840
Conservation work: 2015

Building owner:
Library Hotel Collection

Architectural firm:
ERA Architects Inc.

Craftspeople:
Clifford Restoration Limited

Hotel X Toronto – Stanley Barracks
111 Princes Blvd

The site of Hotel X was once home to New Fort York, later named Stanley Barracks.  Of the six original buildings, only the Officer’s Quarters and the foundation walls of what once was the East Enlisted Men’s Barracks survive.

This project sought to expose, protect and integrate the remains of the Barracks into the design of the new hotel. Restoration of the foundation walls included cutting out and repointing deteriorated mortar joints, repointing and selective grouting of stone foundation walls, resetting loose masonry units, replacing deteriorated bricks, and flaunching mortar caps where the top of walls were exposed.


Original building: 1913
Conservation work: 2016

Building Owner:
Capital Assets, Museums and Heritage Services, City of Toronto

Architectural firm:
+VG

Craftspeople:
Clifford Restoration Ltd.

John McKenzie House
34 Parkview Avenue

The 1913 slate roof was stripped from John McKenzie House in the 1970s and replaced by an asphalt shingle roof, which was renewed in 1993. In 2015, The Ontario Historical Society partnered with the City of Toronto to install a new roof that would match the original design of the home.

Details taken into consideration during the planning process include: the age and source of the Douglas fir used for the soffits and dormers; the size and colour of the slate; the materials and profiles used for the gutters, downspouts, and flashings; and the colour of the mortar used to repoint the chimneys.


Original building: 1848
Conservation work: 2016

Building owner:
The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Toronto

Architectural firm:
+VG

Craftspeople:
Clifford Restoration Limited

St. Michael’s Cathedral: Cathedral Nave
65 Bond Street

This rehabilitation project strove to maintain and re-establish the integrity of the original Gothic Revival design, while at the same time taking a balanced approach to meet the current needs of the building owner and occupants.

Restoration work on the Cathedral Nave included hand-carved Gothic Revival white oak millwork; in-situ plaster conservation; replica plaster castings; hand-painted and gilded plaster ceilings and walls; intricately patterned slate and marble flooring; stone wainscoting; hand-crafted ironwork railings; and a hand-built custom pipe organ “Opus-3907.”


Original window: 1858
Conservation work: 2016

Building owner:
The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Toronto

Architectural firm:
+VG

Craftspeople:
Clifford Restoration Limited

St. Michael’s Cathedral: East Chancel Window
65 Bond Street

The St. Michael’s Cathedral east chancel window is 620 sq.ft., and contains one of the oldest and largest stained glass artworks in Canada, which dates from 1858.  Completed as a separate project within the Cathedral rehabilitation masterplan, the great east window presented a unique set of conservation challenges.

The complex project combined conservation of the original wood frame and stained glass, removal of previous interventions, and the introduction of a new contemporary structural steel frame and exterior glazing system, designed to address an inherent structural deficiency in the original window while protecting the heritage fabric and improving performance of the building envelope.


Original building: 1911
Conservation work: 2015

Building owner:
Allied Properties REIT

Architectural firm:
Sweeny& Co Architects Inc.

Queen Richmond Centre West
134 Peter Street

This adaptive reuse project converted the original 4-storey Weston’s Biscuit Factory buildings into a mixed-use 17-storey office and retail building.  It features a sweeping wooden ceiling that covers the atrium and the floor-to-ceiling suspended structured glazing that encloses the space between the two century-old industrial buildings.

Restoration work was done on one of the building’s original wooden structure, while the other building required a new concrete structure.  Wood from the 134 Peter structure was reused throughout the building as public benches, town hall bleachers, wall and ceiling coverings and more.